The 32nd General Chapter
The 32nd General Chapter began its deliberations at Las Termas de Rio Hondo, Argentina Le 32ème Chapitre Général a Las Termas de Rio Hondo - Argentine. Czytaj więcej
Fr. Rene Butler MS - Fourth Sunday of Easter -...
Belonging(Fourth Sunday of Easter: Acts 4:8-12; 1 John 3:1-2; John 10:11-18)This is Good Shepherd Sunday. Each of the three years of the liturgical cycle has—on the fourth Sunday of Easter—we hear a different portion of John 10, where Jesus calls himself... Czytaj więcej
Fr. Rene Butler MS - Third Sunday of Easter -...
Facts of Life(Third Sunday of Easter: Acts 3:13-19; 1 John 2:1-5; Luke 24:35-48)St. Peter takes a conciliatory approach in addressing those who crucified Jesus: “You acted out of ignorance.” And he offers them the prospect of having their sins wiped... Czytaj więcej
Fr. Rene Butler MS - Easter - Witnesses
Witnesses(Easter: Acts 10:34-43; Colossians 3:1-4; John 20:1-9. Other options possible.)In the first reading, Peter states that he and his companions were witnesses to three distinct realities: 1) Jesus’ public ministry; 2) the risen Christ; and 3) that Jesus... Czytaj więcej
Fr. Rene Butler MS - Second Sunday of Easter -...
Imperfect Faith(Second Sunday of Easter: Acts 4:32-35; 1 John 5:1-6; John 20:19-31)The end of Chapter 4 of the Acts of the Apostles paints a picture of the first Christians as a perfect society. Chapter 5, however begins with the story of a couple who tried to... Czytaj więcej
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Fr. Rene Butler MS - Palm Sunday - Paradoxical

Paradoxical
(Palm Sunday: Mark 11:1-10; Isaiah 50:4-7; Philippians 2:6-11; Mark 14:1—15:47)
The readings for Palm Sunday create unexpected pairings. In the first Gospel passage, Jesus is recognized by the crowd as the one who comes in the name of the Lord, before whom they shout ‘Hosanna.’ Later the crowd clamors for his crucifixion. On Calvary, the Roman centurion supervising the crucifixion of Jesus comes to believe that Jesus is the Son of God.
The Psalm, which begins with a famous cry of despair, ends on a note of exultation. God’s servant described by Isaiah is treated shamefully, yet firmly believes he will not be put to shame. And St. Paul portrays Jesus as emptying and humbling himself, obedient to the point of death, but also as exalted, given a name above all other names—Lord.
It ought not to surprise us to find similar pairings at La Salette. Mary appears in heavenly light, but she weeps. She speaks of the dire consequences of lost faith, and yet does so with infinite gentleness. She gives an important mission to two children who can scarcely make sense of what she has said to them.
When we look at the Church, we find much the same. The brilliant English author G.K. Chesterton (1874-1936) pointed out many paradoxes which one finds in the Church: variously criticized as “the enemy of women, and their foolish refuge;” a “solemn pessimist and a silly optimist,” who produced “fierce crusaders and meek saints;” the list goes on at some length. He sums up his thoughts with the central paradox of Christian theology: “Christ was not a being apart from God and man, like an elf, nor yet a being half human and half not, like a centaur, but both things at once and both things thoroughly, very man and very God.”
This pairing of “true man and true God” is indeed at the very center of our faith. Hard as it is to understand, we proclaim it in our creed.
These are not simply theological musings. They say a lot about us as well. As Christians we are a paradox; we are aware of the contradictions within ourselves, sinners and saints that we are, individually and as Church. The La Salette call to conversion must be taken seriously, but we will never be able to say: Now I am holy. And yet we do not despair of reaching that goal under the watchful eye of the Beautiful Lady.

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