Fr. Rene Butler MS - Thirty-second Sunday - Seat...
Seat of Wisdom(Thirty-second Sunday in Ordinary Time: Wisdom 6:12-16; 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18; Matthew 25:1-13)Confucius says: By three methods we may learn wisdom: First, by reflection, which is noblest; second, by imitation, which is easiest; and third by... Czytaj więcej
Philippines - INA NA PAG-ASA PROVINCE Provincial...
INA NG PAG-ASA PROVINCE Provincial Chapter 2 017 October 25, 2017 Biga, Siilang, Cavite During the Provincial Chapter 2017 from October 23-26, 2017 held at the National Shrine of Ouor Lady of La Salette at Silang, Father Rosanno Soriano, MS was elected as Provincial... Czytaj więcej
Fr. Rene Butler MS - Thirty-first Sunday - Call...
Call to Integrity(Thirty-first Sunday in Ordinary Time: Malachi 1:14-2:10; 1 Thessalonians 2:7-13; Matthew 23:1-12)Today’s reflection is definitely off the beaten path. Malachi’s strong words to the priests of his day, and Jesus’ criticism of the... Czytaj więcej
Fr. Rene Butler MS - Thirtieth Sunday - Always...
Always and Everywhere(Thirtieth Sunday in Ordinary Time: Exodus 22:20-26; 1 Thessalonians 1:5-10; Matthew 22:34-40)Years ago, I attended a wedding where the couple composed their own vows. The groom began with the promise to respect and support his wife, in good times... Czytaj więcej
prev
next

Sanctuaries most visited

Fr. Rene Butler MS - Dominion - Thirteenth Sunday

Dominion
(Thirteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time: 2 Kings 4:8-16; Romans 6:3-11; Matthew 10: 37-42)
Did you notice how many times St. Paul refers to death in our second reading? I count about ten. He also mentions sin, twice. His point, however, is to talk about life, which he also mentions explicitly several times.
All these elements come together in the last sentence: “You too must think of yourselves as dead to sin and living for God in Christ Jesus.“
The context is baptism, in which we died with Christ so as to live with him. Death no longer has dominion over him or us, and neither does sin.
That presumes that we are faithful to our baptismal commitments. Christians baptized as infants will be expected at some point to ratify for themselves the profession of faith made on their behalf.
But experience teaches that this fidelity cannot be presumed, that this ratification is by no means guaranteed. Thus the dominion of death and of sin comes to be reestablished.
Such was the situation that caused Mary to come to La Salette. She spoke some challenging words, but not so challenging as those we find in today’s Gospel. Jesus demands our absolute and total loyalty. We have to take up our cross. That is the cost of discipleship.
It ought not to surprise us that many people are unwilling to accept these demands—today, as in 1846 and in the ancient Greek and Roman and Asian world where the Gospel was first preached.
At La Salette, Our Lady shows regret at the situation into which her people have fallen, materially and spiritually; she cannot bear to see the dominion of sin and death in their lives. She weeps because they have lost respect for her Son and the things of God. Their baptism no longer means anything to them.
But she shows determination as well. She will not simply stand by and let them reap the consequences of their sins.
On her breast she shows us Christ crucified, to remind us that he who died for our sins did so in order that we might truly live. The cost of discipleship cannot compare to the price Jesus paid to save us.
Whose dominion will we choose: Christ’s or death’s?

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Sign in with Google+ Subscribe on YouTube Subscribe to RSS Upload to Flickr

Recently added

Missionaries in USA

Login >>> ELENCHUS

Go to top