The 32nd General Chapter
The 32nd General Chapter began its deliberations at Las Termas de Rio Hondo, Argentina Le 32ème Chapitre Général a Las Termas de Rio Hondo - Argentine. Czytaj więcej
Fr. Rene Butler MS - Fourth Sunday of Easter -...
Belonging(Fourth Sunday of Easter: Acts 4:8-12; 1 John 3:1-2; John 10:11-18)This is Good Shepherd Sunday. Each of the three years of the liturgical cycle has—on the fourth Sunday of Easter—we hear a different portion of John 10, where Jesus calls himself... Czytaj więcej
Fr. Rene Butler MS - Third Sunday of Easter -...
Facts of Life(Third Sunday of Easter: Acts 3:13-19; 1 John 2:1-5; Luke 24:35-48)St. Peter takes a conciliatory approach in addressing those who crucified Jesus: “You acted out of ignorance.” And he offers them the prospect of having their sins wiped... Czytaj więcej
Fr. Rene Butler MS - Easter - Witnesses
Witnesses(Easter: Acts 10:34-43; Colossians 3:1-4; John 20:1-9. Other options possible.)In the first reading, Peter states that he and his companions were witnesses to three distinct realities: 1) Jesus’ public ministry; 2) the risen Christ; and 3) that Jesus... Czytaj więcej
Fr. Rene Butler MS - Second Sunday of Easter -...
Imperfect Faith(Second Sunday of Easter: Acts 4:32-35; 1 John 5:1-6; John 20:19-31)The end of Chapter 4 of the Acts of the Apostles paints a picture of the first Christians as a perfect society. Chapter 5, however begins with the story of a couple who tried to... Czytaj więcej
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Fr. Rene Butler MS - Solemnity of Christ the King - Like King, Like Queen

Like King, Like Queen
(Solemnity of Christ the King: Ezekiel 34:11-17; 1 Corinthians 15:20-28; Matthew 25:31-46)
Hungry, thirsty, naked, stranger, sick, in prison. That’s the checklist Jesus uses in the famous judgment scene in Matthew’s gospel. There is another list, in today’s reading from Ezekiel, where the Lord catalogues all the things he will do for his sheep which, as we find in the preceding verses (not included), the official shepherds have failed to do.

But, as with other lists in the Scriptures, these are not exhaustive. They point us in a certain direction and allow us to see beyond the list, to draw up “new, improved” lists according to the world we live in. This is exactly how many Religious Orders came into existence. Some literally feed the hungry and clothe the naked. Some meet other, equally urgent, needs.
Interestingly, though hunger and sickness are specifically mentioned in the message of La Salette, the perspective is quite different. There they are seen as the consequence of sin.

When people bring misfortune on themselves, we can be “judgmental,” content to blame them. But we are not dispensed from reaching out to them in their need. Jesus identifies himself with “the least,” the lowest of the low, whom we might think of as “those people.” What we do or fail to do—even for them—we do or fail to do for him. Jesus says that none of us has the right to look the other way when confronted by the essential needs of others.
Our Lady, whom we also call the “Queen of La Salette,” not content to blame her people, saw beyond their sufferings. She came to “seek out the lost and bring back the strayed,” (cf. Ezekiel) promising abundance “if they are converted.”
She spoke of Lent. How can we adopt Lenten practices, and not be aware of the death of children and the famines that continue to occur in our world? If we are converted, we will not turn a blind eye.
In the Gospel, it is clear that the failure to respond to the needs of others reflects a failure to grasp the full implications of discipleship.
Once again, the message of Our Lady of La Salette is remarkably close to the message of Christ. King and Queen are in perfect accord.

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