Mary and the signs of the times
Mary and the signs of the times December 2020 Mary teaches how to interpret the course of history… The title of this section allows us to appreciate two realities: 1. the profound continuity between the Prophets in the Bible and the “Beautiful... Czytaj więcej
Mary and the signs of the times
Mary and the signs of the times December 2020 Mary teaches how to interpret the course of history… The title of this section allows us to appreciate two realities: 1. the profound continuity between the Prophets in the Bible and the “Beautiful... Czytaj więcej
Fr. René Butler MS - 4th Sunday of Advent - Who?...
Who? Me? (4th Sunday of Advent: 2 Samuel 7:1-16; Romans 16:25-27; Luke 1:26-38) When they first saw a globe of light at the place where they had eaten their lunch of bread and cheese, Maximin told Mélanie to hold on to her staff, in case of danger. They... Czytaj więcej
Fr. René Butler MS - 3rd Sunday of Advent -...
Rejoice Always (3rd Sunday of Advent: Isaiah 61:1-11; 1 Thessalonians 5:16-24; John 1:6-28) We all know people who are not cheerful. Some are simply of a somber disposition; others are afraid of what lies ahead, or they may be mourning a loss, recent or old. In... Czytaj więcej
Fr. René Butler MS - 2nd Sunday of Advent -...
Comforting Justice (2nd Sunday of Advent: Isaiah 40:1-11; 2 Peter 3:8-14; Mark 1:1-8) About four months ago, we had the same Responsorial Psalm (85) as today, and we commented on the words, “justice and peace shall kiss,” as opposites. In the... Czytaj więcej
prev
next

Sanctuaries most visited

Fr. René Butler MS - 27th Ordinary Sunday - Anxiety, with Trust

Anxiety, with Trust

(27th Ordinary Sunday: Isaiah 5:1-7; Philippians 4:6-9; Matthew 21:33-43)

St. Paul writes, “Have no anxiety at all.” Surely this is unrealistic. In fact, the same Apostle wrote to the Corinthians, “I came to you in weakness and fear and much trembling” (1 Cor 2:3).

The world we live in has always provided every generation ample cause for worry. Natural disasters, disease, social unrest, economic uncertainty are all around us. We also deal with personal loss, conflicts and self-doubt, etc. How is it possible to be without anxiety?

For some it is even hard to find time to pray, or have a proper frame of mind for prayer, so as to live in the peace of Christ.

Strangely, Isaiah’s song about his friend’s vineyard was, in fact, meant to heighten his people’s stress. The things the Lord will do to his vineyard are listed in order to get his people’s attention. He would rather not punish them, but how else can he persuade them to change their ways?

At La Salette, Mary used the same approach as Isaiah, and for the same purpose. If her people refuse to submit, the causes of their anxiety will only get worse, and it will be their own fault for, in their own way, like the chief priests and the elders in the Gospel, they have rejected her Son.

It certainly is appropriate for us to apply Isaiah’s message, and Mary’s, to ourselves. The vineyard lovingly planted in each of us by God at our baptism, needs to be watered and pruned, so that we can produce sweet grapes to make fine wine. The Beautiful Lady provides us with an examination of conscience, in view of our ongoing conversion.

St. Paul further says, “In everything, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, make your requests known to God.” When thanksgiving is at the heart of our prayer, trust is reinforced. This is part of praying well.

In this context, I highly recommend the Book of Tobit as a marvelous example. Two unhappy persons, in separate scenes, pray for death. In each case the prayer begins with praise of God! 

Are anxiety and trust incompatible? No, but Mary’s love and tears will inspire trust and relieve anxiety.

Wayne Vanasse, and Fr. René Butler, M.S.

Sign in with Google+ Subscribe on YouTube Subscribe to RSS Upload to Flickr

Missionaries in USA

Login >>> ELENCHUS

Go to top