Fr. René Butler MS - Palm Sunday - Voluntary...
Voluntary Humiliation (Palm Sunday: Mark 11:1-10; Isaiah 50:4-7; Philippians 2:6-11; Mark 14–15) Jesus anticipated the acclamation of the admiring crowd. He even arranged for a mount so as to be more visible. The people were thrilled to welcome him as their... Czytaj więcej
Fr. René Butler MS - 5th Sunday of Lent - A...
A Willing Spirit (5th Sunday of Lent: Jeremiah 31:31-34; Hebrews 5:7-9; John 12:20-33) Does it puzzle you to read in the Letter to the Hebrews that Jesus, “Son though he was, learned obedience, was made perfect, and became the source of eternal... Czytaj więcej
Fr. René Butler MS - 4th Sunday of Lent - Going...
Going Back up to Jerusalem (4th Sunday of Lent: 2 Chronicles 36:14-23; Ephesians 2:4-10; John 3:14-21) Cyrus, the King of Persia, respected the cultures and religions of the peoples under his rule. But he must have received some sort of revelation from the God of... Czytaj więcej
Fr. René Butler MS - 3rd Sunday of Lent - The...
The Lord Our God (3rd Sunday of Lent: Exodus 20:1-17; 1 Corinthians 1:22-25; John 2:13-25) Do you remember what God said when Moses asked him his name? The Lord answered categorically, “I am who am,” and told Moses to tell the people, “I AM sent me... Czytaj więcej
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Fr. René Butler MS - 6th Ordinary Sunday - Moved with Pity

Moved with Pity

(6th Ordinary Sunday: Leviticus 13:1-2,44-46; 1 Cor. 10:31—11:1; Mark 1:40-45)

St. Paul, in the second reading, describes his ministry as “not seeking my own benefit but that of the many, that they may be saved.”

This is exactly the example given by Jesus in the Gospel. He healed a leper, but not to attract attention to himself. Otherwise, why would he ask the man not to tell anyone, and why would Mark mention the inconvenience caused to Jesus when his fame began to spread?

Jesus acted because he was moved with pity. Before him knelt a man who was not only sick, but who was obliged by the Law of God to self-isolate, to practice social distancing, and to cover his mouth.

Moved with pity, the Mother of Jesus came in tears to La Salette. She asked nothing for herself. She was concerned about others: her people and her Son.

We might ask ourselves, “When is the last time I felt pity?” No doubt we will find many examples, among family and friends, or from the news reports of disasters and tragedies of all kinds. There are forms of marginalization directed at others because of social, religious and even political differences. Opportunities for experiencing pity abound.

The next question is harder. “Moved with pity, how did I act?” Perhaps the question seems unfair. After all, Jesus and Mary were able to intervene in a supernatural way.

La Salette priests are in a position, of course, to administer the Sacrament of Reconciliation. They do so gladly, and La Salette Shrines specialize, so to speak, in making confessors readily available.

For sin is a disease underlying so much of the evil in today’s world. Today’s Psalm offers great hope: “I acknowledged my sin to you, my guilt I covered not... and you took away the guilt of my sin.”

Priest or not, all of us can do something. Most of us will spontaneously respond to console someone we know who has suffered a great loss. Dedicated to the cause of reconciliation, we are determined never to be the cause of alienation to another person.

Jesus showed no hesitation before the leper’s plea. “I do will it.” Like Jesus, like Mary, let’s do what we can.

Wayne Vanasse, and Fr. René Butler, M.S.

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