René Butler MS - 7th Sunday of Easter - Ready,...
Ready, Willing, Able (7th Sunday of Easter: Acts 7:55-60; Revelation 22:12-20; John 17:20-26) The death of Steven is recorded in the first reading. The account includes this sentence: “The witnesses laid down their cloaks at the feet of a young man named... Czytaj więcej
René Butler MS - 6th Sunday of Easter - The Holy...
The Holy Spirit and Us (6th Sunday of Easter: Acts 15:1-2, 22-29; Rev. 21:10-14, 22-23; John 14:23-29) The letter sent to the Gentile Christians, in today’s first reading, is essential to our understanding of the Church. The resolution of the crisis is... Czytaj więcej
René Butler MS - 5th Sunday of Easter - All...
All Things New (5th Sunday of Easter: Acts 14:21-27; Revelation 21:1-5; John 13:31-35) The closing words of today’s reading from the Apocalypse, “Behold, I make all things new,” seem to radiate through all of today’s liturgy. The word... Czytaj więcej
René Butler MS - 4th Sunday of Easter - The New...
The New Evangelization (4th Sunday of Easter: Acts 13:14, 43-52; Revelation 7: 9, 14-17; John 10:27-30) In our second reading, from Revelation, John describes “a great multitude, which no one could count, from every nation, race, people, and tongue... who have... Czytaj więcej
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René Butler MS - 2nd Sunday of Easter - The One who Lives

The One who Lives

(2nd Sunday of Easter: Acts 5:12-16; Revelation 1:9-19; John 20:19-31)

Scholars generally agree that John, the author of the fourth Gospel, also wrote Revelation. In both, Jesus often uses the phrase “I am” in a way that is reminiscent of God’s words to Moses, which we read not long ago: “I AM WHO AM.”

We have an example in today’s reading from Revelation: “I am the first and the last, the one who lives.” Jesus gives himself important names, describing who he is in his very being. He goes on to say that he is “alive forever and ever”—an even more emphatic version of his words at the Last Supper, “I am the Way, and the Truth, and the Life.”

Then we read a mysterious saying, “I hold the keys to death and the netherworld.” It seems to combine the notions of power and judgment, such as we find at La Salette when Mary speaks of “the arm of my Son.”

The Beautiful Lady’s words are subject to various interpretations, but taken in the context of other parts of her discourse, such as: “If I want my Son not to abandon you,” and “I warned you last year with the potatoes,” it is hard not to accept the traditional reading.

But today is Divine Mercy Sunday. You have seen the image, with rays emanating from Jesus’ heart. In our La Salette context we have often noted that the light of the Apparition came from the crucifix which Mary bore on her breast. The great news she came to deliver comes from that cross. La Salette is a merciful apparition.

Jesus, the one who lives, breathes on us as he did on the Apostles in today’s Gospel. To them and their successors he gave special power and judgment to forgive or retain sins. To us he gives our charism of reconciliation, which shines forth with special brilliance on this day.

Forgiveness is the goal, freely offered to all who will choose to submit to the divine will and change their lives accordingly. It was among the “signs and wonders” mentioned in the first reading.

We haven’t forgotten the doubting Thomas. Let us stand with him and the other Apostles as we gratefully and lovingly accept Jesus’ greeting: “Peace be with you.”

Wayne Vanasse, and Fr. René Butler, M.S.

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