Fr. René Butler MS - 3rd Sunday of Advent -...
Mission of Joy (3rd Sunday of Advent: Zephaniah 3:14-18; Philippians 4:4-7; Luke 3:10-18) Today is Gaudete (Rejoice) Sunday, so we are not surprised to hear Zephaniah telling Jerusalem, and Paul the Philippians, to rejoice. Both are beyond enthusiastic! But someone... Czytaj więcej
Madagaskar - Chapter
Madagaskar – Provincial Chapter Provincial Chapter: November 10-14, 2021 New Provincial Council Fr. Bertrand Ranaivoarisoa, provincial superior (center) Fr. Gérard Ramaroson, provincial vicar (left) Fr. Hervé Martin Rafalimalalanirina, second... Czytaj więcej
Fr. René Butler MS - 2nd Sunday of Advent - From...
From Misery to Glory (2nd Sunday of Advent: Baruch 5:1-9; Philippians 1:4-6, 8-11; Luke 3:1-6) The opening of today’s text from Baruch is wonderful: “Jerusalem, take off your robe of mourning and misery; put on the splendor of glory from God... Czytaj więcej
Fr. René Butler MS - 1st Sunday of Advent -...
Teach me your Paths (1st Sunday of Advent: Jeremiah 33:14-16; 1 Thessalonians 3:12-4:2; Luke 21:25-36) Today we begin Year C in the Church’s three-year liturgical cycle. We have been this way before, and much will be familiar. Still, it is a new year, a new... Czytaj więcej
Fr. René Butler MS - Christ the King - King...
King Forever (Christ the King: Daniel 7:13-14; Revelation 1:5-8; John 18:33-37) Alpha is the first letter of the Greek alphabet; Omega is the last. In the New Testament (written in Greek), they appear only in Revelation, always together, four times, on the lips of... Czytaj więcej
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Items filtered by date: November 2021

Mission of Joy

(3rd Sunday of Advent: Zephaniah 3:14-18; Philippians 4:4-7; Luke 3:10-18)

Today is Gaudete (Rejoice) Sunday, so we are not surprised to hear Zephaniah telling Jerusalem, and Paul the Philippians, to rejoice. Both are beyond enthusiastic!

But someone else is rejoicing, too. Look at the end of the first reading. “The Lord, your God, is in your midst, a mighty savior; he will rejoice over you with gladness, and renew you in his love, he will sing joyfully because of you, as one sings at festivals.” Is there any image of God more likely than this to bring joy into our hearts?

Zephaniah gives the reason: “The Lord has removed the judgment against you... The King of Israel, the Lord, is in your midst, you have no further misfortune to fear.”

God’s judgment was certainly just; his people were rightly punished. But mercy triumphed, and once again God was willing to make a fresh start. The tears of the Beautiful Lady of La Salette, falling on the crucifix over her heart, are a sign of mercy, Mary’s way of telling us that the Lord, whose judgment is just, has no desire to abandon us entirely. She is letting her people know that God wants to be close to us, to renew his love for us and restore his covenant with us.

The Lord Emmanuel is near. Therefore, we ought to rejoice always, and the expression of this joy should flow out of us into the world around us. That, however, is easier said than done. During Advent, in particular, some experience more stress than at other times, due either to the many preparations for Christmas, or to the painful loneliness that, strangely, the season can intensify.

In this context, let us remember John the Baptist. The Gospels do not depict him as especially joyful, but today’s Gospel Acclamation seems to apply to him the text from Isaiah: “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me to bring glad tidings to the poor.” His glad tidings take the form of a call to genuine conversion, but in view of the promise of another who is to come.

Whether our La Salette mission is more like John’s or like Zephaniah’s and Paul’s, let us carry it out with all the joy we can.

Wayne Vanasse, and Fr. René Butler, M.S.

Published in MISSION (EN)
Sunday, 14 November 2021 17:31

Madagaskar - Chapter

Madagaskar – Provincial Chapter

Provincial Chapter: November 10-14, 2021

New Provincial Council

Fr. Bertrand Ranaivoarisoa, provincial superior (center)

Fr. Gérard Ramaroson, provincial vicar (left)

Fr. Hervé Martin Rafalimalalanirina, second assistant (right)

May the Holy Spirit enlighten the new Council in the service to the Province.

Published in INFO (EN)

From Misery to Glory

(2nd Sunday of Advent: Baruch 5:1-9; Philippians 1:4-6, 8-11; Luke 3:1-6)

The opening of today’s text from Baruch is wonderful: “Jerusalem, take off your robe of mourning and misery; put on the splendor of glory from God forever.” In fact, the entire reading brims over with hope and consolation.

Depending on our circumstances, we might replace “Jerusalem” with our own name, or our family or some larger group. There are moments in every life when we need to throw off the robe of misery. God’s will for us is joy.

St. Paul writes to the Philippians, “I pray always with joy in my every prayer for all of you... And this is my prayer: that your love may increase ever more and more in knowledge and every kind of perception, to discern what is of value.”

John the Baptist appears in the Gospel, “proclaiming a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins.” Mary came to La Salette in tears, but she too brought hope and left a message of reconciliation. She wanted, in the words of the Psalm, to “restore our fortunes like the torrents in the southern desert.”

In fact, consider how many words of today’s Psalm can easily be associated with the Beautiful Lady and her message: tears, seed, sowing, reaping, etc.

The same may be said of the first reading. Mary shows herself in both an attitude of mourning and the splendor of glory. She stands upon the heights, looking upon her children—the two innocents standing with her, as well as her wayward people whom she desires to gather “by the light of God’s glory, with his mercy and justice for company.” In our own way, as reconcilers, we must also stand upon the heights. As Jesus said in the Sermon on the Mount, “You are the light of the world. A city set on a mountain cannot be hidden... Just so, your light must shine before others, that they may see your good deeds and glorify your heavenly Father” (Matthew 5: 14, 16).

May we all be cloaked in justice and mercy, bearing on our heads “the mitre that displays the glory of the eternal name.” In this way we may hope to attract others to Christ and, in the words of St. Paul, help them “to discern what is of value.”

Wayne Vanasse, and Fr. René Butler, M.S.

Published in MISSION (EN)

Teach me your Paths

(1st Sunday of Advent: Jeremiah 33:14-16; 1 Thessalonians 3:12-4:2; Luke 21:25-36)

Today we begin Year C in the Church’s three-year liturgical cycle. We have been this way before, and much will be familiar. Still, it is a new year, a new spiritual journey, for we have changed, as has the world around us.

Every journey has a starting point and a final destination. So let us make ours the words of today’s Psalm: “Your ways, O Lord, make known to me; teach me your paths, guide me in your truth and teach me.” We do not want to lose our way.

There will be a number of stops along the way. The first will be in Bethlehem, as we celebrate the coming of the promised Messiah.

We hear in the first reading, “The days are coming, says the Lord, when I will fulfill the promise I made... I will raise up for David a just shoot; he shall do what is right and just in the land.” The One who is to come will teach by word and example.

At La Salette, the Weeping Mother appeared to two children to give a message of hope, that promises made would be fulfilled. She was offering guidance to a people that was not doing what was right and just. They were on a path that did not lead toward God but away from God.

Mary is also urging us to be faithful in prayer. We should want to pray worthily, that is, from the heart, asking the Lord to always direct our steps on the path toward him.

The second reading is from Paul’s First Letter to the Thessalonians, which is full of instruction intended to keep the young Christian community on the right path. Here, in the context of Christ’s return, we read: “May the Lord make you increase and abound in love for one another and for all.” This reminds us that we are connected to others, on the same path with us.

Jesus tells us to be vigilant. “Beware that your hearts do not become drowsy from carousing and drunkenness and the anxieties of daily life.” We cannot afford to stray from the way he shows us as he guides us.

Most of the Gospel readings in Year C will come from Luke’s Gospel. Let us allow him to be our guide, leading us along a path toward God, who is the source of all we need and hope for.

Wayne Vanasse, and Fr. René Butler, M.S.

Published in MISSION (EN)
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