Fr. René Butler MS - 3rd Sunday of Advent -...
Mission of Joy (3rd Sunday of Advent: Zephaniah 3:14-18; Philippians 4:4-7; Luke 3:10-18) Today is Gaudete (Rejoice) Sunday, so we are not surprised to hear Zephaniah telling Jerusalem, and Paul the Philippians, to rejoice. Both are beyond enthusiastic! But someone... Czytaj więcej
Madagaskar - Chapter
Madagaskar – Provincial Chapter Provincial Chapter: November 10-14, 2021 New Provincial Council Fr. Bertrand Ranaivoarisoa, provincial superior (center) Fr. Gérard Ramaroson, provincial vicar (left) Fr. Hervé Martin Rafalimalalanirina, second... Czytaj więcej
Fr. René Butler MS - 2nd Sunday of Advent - From...
From Misery to Glory (2nd Sunday of Advent: Baruch 5:1-9; Philippians 1:4-6, 8-11; Luke 3:1-6) The opening of today’s text from Baruch is wonderful: “Jerusalem, take off your robe of mourning and misery; put on the splendor of glory from God... Czytaj więcej
Fr. René Butler MS - 1st Sunday of Advent -...
Teach me your Paths (1st Sunday of Advent: Jeremiah 33:14-16; 1 Thessalonians 3:12-4:2; Luke 21:25-36) Today we begin Year C in the Church’s three-year liturgical cycle. We have been this way before, and much will be familiar. Still, it is a new year, a new... Czytaj więcej
Fr. René Butler MS - Christ the King - King...
King Forever (Christ the King: Daniel 7:13-14; Revelation 1:5-8; John 18:33-37) Alpha is the first letter of the Greek alphabet; Omega is the last. In the New Testament (written in Greek), they appear only in Revelation, always together, four times, on the lips of... Czytaj więcej
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Items filtered by date: August 2021

Where Blessings Flow

(Feast of La Salette: Genesis 9:8-17; 2 Corinthians 5:17-20; John 19:25-27)

Dear La Salette sisters and brothers, you are reading this on or about September 19, 2021, the 175th anniversary of the Apparition of Our Lady of La Salette. Unfortunately, the space we have is too small for us to say all that is in our hearts, but we do wish you an abundant share in the blessings flowing down from that Holy Mountain.

Those blessings find their source at Mount Calvary, the scene of the Gospel. There, Mary surely wept at the finger-pointing vindictiveness of Jesus’ enemies, whereas at La Salette her tears were caused by the abuse of his Name and the mockery of his Sacrament by her people. Which was worse?

Only one of Jesus’s disciples stood by her side. The rest fled in fear or, perhaps, disappointment. What ambitions of theirs were dashed that day? And yet it was he who had told them, “If anyone wishes to be first, he shall be the last of all and the servant of all” (Mark 9:35). The Blessed Virgin, who at the dawn of our salvation had called herself the handmaid of the Lord, now spoke of the pains she was taking on our behalf.

In the second reading, St. Paul writes, “We implore you, in Christ's name: be reconciled to God!” There is perhaps no other Scripture that echoes so powerfully at La Salette. Mary speaks of certain sins committed by her people, but these are examples. It was the evil inclination of the human heart that moved God first to destroy all mortals, but then to take pity and make a covenant of peace with them, in the first reading.

We all struggle at one time or another against pride, wrath, greed, and the rest of the deadly sins. If we are responsible for children, we try to form them, while they are still innocent, in the virtues of humility, patience, generosity, etc.; but we also know how important—and hard—it is to teach by example.

Reconciliation has a starting point in our life but it does not end there. Many times it needs to be renewed, by praying well and through the sacraments. We need never be discouraged, for there is a Beautiful Lady who joins her tears to her Son’s blood flowing down from Calvary, bringing the blessings of hope and mercy into the midst of our sinfulness.

Wayne Vanasse, and Fr. René Butler, M.S.

Published in MISSION (EN)

Think Again

(24th Ordinary Sunday: Isaiah 50:5-9; James 2:14-18; Mark 8:27-35)

If you have already seen today’s readings, we have a quiz question for you. How many parts of the body can you remember that are mentioned in the first reading and the Psalm? We will return to this later.

In the Gospel, after listening to the rumors circulating about him, Jesus asks his disciples, “But who do you say that I am?” Peter answers for all, “You are the Christ,” i.e., the Anointed One, the Messiah. This is a pivotal moment in their life. Jesus now has to prepare them for what lies ahead. He is about to begin his final journey to Jerusalem, and he tells them to rethink their messianic ideas.

Peter is shocked! His reaction, misguided though it is, is understandable. Words like “suffer... be rejected... be killed” do not belong in the same sentence with “Messiah.” Jesus might as well have added: “I will give my back to those who beat me, my cheeks to those who pluck my beard; my face I will not shield from buffets and spitting,” to paraphrase Isaiah.

Mary at La Salette provides her tearful answer to Jesus’ question. He is her Son, who is the Christ, the Anointed One, the Messiah. Her large crucifix, however, accompanied by hammer and pincers, shows him not in the majesty of power but in the beaten, bruised image of redeeming love.

Today’s text from Isaiah invites us to revise our understanding of suffering and humiliation. No matter what we face as Christians, we too can say, “The Lord God is my help, therefore I am not disgraced.”

Returning to the quiz question that opened this reflection, the answer is six: ear, back, cheeks, face, eyes and feet. In the Bible, parts of the body are often a poetic way of saying “I,” e.g., “my eyes have seen.”

St. James tells his readers to take a new look at the meaning of faith. It is internal and external. “I will demonstrate my faith to you from my works,” he writes. A poem attributed to St. Teresa of Avila puts it this way: “Christ has no body but yours... Yours are the hands, yours are the feet, yours are the eyes, you are his body.” Let us use them with courageous faith, that through our works others may come to know Christ and rejoice in his boundless mercy.

Wayne Vanasse, and Fr. René Butler, M.S.

Published in MISSION (EN)
Saturday, 21 August 2021 05:50

Rosary - September 2021

Published in LAY ASSOCIATES (EN)

Be Opened!

(23rd Ordinary Sunday: Isaiah 35:4-7; James 2:1-5; Mark 7:31-37)

The texts the Church puts before us today might at first appear somewhat less challenging or stimulating than usual. On the other hand the La Salette connections to these readings are abundant and fertile.

In Isaiah: “Say to those whose hearts are frightened: Be strong, fear not! ... Streams will burst forth in the desert, and rivers in the steppe.” We hear the Beautiful Lady’s first words to Mélanie and Maximin. We see the miraculous fountain.

In the Psalm: “The God of Jacob... gives food to the hungry...; the way of the wicked he thwarts.” We recall Mary’s promise of abundance if her people take her words to heart... and her fear of further calamities if they do not.

In James: “Show no partiality... Did not God choose those who are poor in the world?” Maximin’s family was far from rich; and Mélanie’s was desperately poor.

In the Gospel, the opening of the deaf man’s ears may be seen in Mary’s speaking to the children in their own dialect when she observed that they did not understand French; and the loosening of the man’s tongue is reflected in the surprising responses these uneducated children gave under interrogation.

In fact, “Ephphatha! Be opened!” is central to the La Salette message. The Blessed Virgin came to open people’s eyes to the reality of sin and suffering, their ears to the Word of God, their minds and imagination to new possibilities.

Above all, she wanted to open their hearts to the love of God manifested in the crucified Christ and the Eucharist. This reflects the first line of the Responsorial Psalm: “The God of Jacob keeps faith forever.”

La Salette is an invitation to keep faith with the Lord who “comes with vindication; with divine recompense he comes to save you.” We respond with prayer and respect. Inevitably this will also mean keeping faith with others, whether through reconciliation as needed, or by reaching out to others in their need, whether physical or spiritual.

Mary’s message about keeping faith is timeless and relevant to all ages, groups, and to all her people..

Wayne Vanasse, and Fr. René Butler, M.S.

Published in MISSION (EN)

That you may Live

(22nd Ordinary Sunday: Deuteronomy 4:1-8; James 1:17-27; Mark 7:1-23)

When is the last time someone said to you, “You Catholics are truly a wise and intelligent people. Who else has statutes and decrees that are as just as this whole law which you have?” Probably never.

In the first reading, however, Moses anticipates that other nations will be impressed with the laws and statutes God gave them. He calls on his people to “hear the statutes and decrees which I am teaching you to observe, that you may live.” In other words, the Law, far from being a burden, is a wondrous gift. It will enable them, in the words of today’s Psalm, to walk blamelessly and do justice.

Why, then, in today’s Gospel, is Jesus so critical of the law-abiding Pharisees and scribes? Because they had become the fulfillment of a prophecy: “This people honors me with their lips, but their hearts are far from me” (Isaiah 29:13).

Of those whom Mary called “my people” at La Salette, many did not even pay lip service to the demands of their faith. She told them, in tears, how much she had to plead with her Son on their behalf. She pleaded with them to observe the Law, not out of a spirit of legalism, but for their own sake. She did not want Jesus to abandon them to famine and death. She came that they might live.

Most people are willing to obey the laws of their country. And yet, when it comes to Christian morality and dogma, it is surprisingly easy to “disregard God’s commandment and cling to human tradition.” We forget the injunction, “You shall not add to what I command you (like the Pharisees) nor subtract from it (as we are inclined to do).”

The Israelites did not observe the Law perfectly. Neither have we. We often fall short of God’s plan for us. Relying on his mercy, we try again. This is essential to the message of reconciliation, the call to return to the spirit and practice of our Catholic faith.

St. James writes, “Humbly welcome the word that has been planted in you and is able to save your souls. Be doers of the word and not hearers only.” Humility is essential in our relationship to the Lord’s will.

God knows what gives life. So does the Beautiful Lady.

Wayne Vanasse, and Fr. René Butler, M.S.

Published in MISSION (EN)
Monday, 02 August 2021 08:57

International Concert

INTERNATIONAL CONCERT OF LA SALETTE LAITY

In this very important year in which we commemorate the 175th Anniversary of the apparition of the beautiful Lady, La Salette laity are promoting a “Virtual Thankgiving Concert” for this event. This concert aims to unite La Salette charismatic Family in a cultural event as a source of evangelization and dissemination of the Message of La Salette.

Any member of La Salette charismatic Family, laity or religious, who feels the call and inspiration to write and perform a song dedicated to Our Mother of La Salette may participate, with only one song per country. The song, which should be unpublished, may have its composition based on the story, the fact, the characters, the message, or the mision requested by Our Lady when she appeared in La Salette. It can also be the musicalization of a prayer or part of it.

The international Concert will take place on September 18th, 2021, on the ZOOM platform, at a time determined according to the time zones of the countries. Registration from participating countries will take place until August 31, 2021.

More detailed information can be obtained through the e-mail address: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Published in LAY ASSOCIATES (EN)

How to Serve the Lord, and Why

(21st Ordinary Sunday: Joshua 24:1-18; Ephesians 5:21-32; John 6:60-69)

Warning! This week’s readings will challenge all of us in different ways.

The last time we encountered these readings (three years ago), the title of the reflection was Whom shall we Serve?Everything pointed to the obvious answer— we serve the Lord. For us, the decision is made! We, like Joshua, choose to serve the Lord. Great! Now what? Next comes the how.

What does it actually mean to serve the Lord? What can we do? Our Lady of La Salette gives a partial list: daily prayer, weekly Eucharist, the annual discipline of Lent, respect for the name of the Lord.

The full list comes to us from the Scriptures and the teachings of the Church, which also place before us the importance of love of neighbor, through the Corporal and Spiritual Works of Mercy.

So we are called to prayer, love, mercy. But the how of service does not end with the performance of these things. All of these presuppose two fundamental attitudes: submission and conversion, which we always experience as challenging.

Joshua gave the people options. He said, “Decide today whom you will serve.” This was their moment of truth. They gave the right answer: “We also will serve the Lord, for he is our God.” Was that enough?

The real how of serving the Lord may be summed up as follows: if I faithfully, truly and honestly want to serve the Lord, I may do so only if my commitment to him is absolutely unconditional. But can I really be so sure?

The answer to that question brings us to the why. Simon Peter spoke for the Apostles and, we hope, for us, when he said, “Master, to whom shall we go? You have the words of eternal life. We have come to believe and are convinced that you are the Holy One of God.”

What a powerful statement of faith! Is it ours, too? Do we really believe that our life is nothing without Christ? Are we willing to accept his will, and even be subordinate to each other, out of reverence for him?

The challenges are many, but still we may hope to cry out with the psalmist, “Let my soul glory in the Lord!”

Wayne Vanasse, and Fr. René Butler, M.S.

Published in MISSION (EN)
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