New Provincial Council in Italy
It is with a great joy that we announce the new Provincial Council of the Province of Mary Mediatrix (Italy). The Provincial Chapter which is currently in session in Salmata elected today September 24, 2020:  Fr. Gian Matteo Roggio, Provincial... Czytaj więcej
Fr. René Butler MS - 28th Ordinary Sunday - The...
The Lord will Provide (28th Ordinary Sunday: Isaiah 25:6-10; Philippians 4:12-20; Matthew 22:1-14) Just look at all things that God promises, in our first reading, to provide for his people! The image of rich food and choice wines is so enticing, it might... Czytaj więcej
Marian Year
Marian Year The Marian Year will begin on 19 September 2020. The Congregation of the Missionaries of Our Lady of La Salette and the Lay faithful Who carry and are very close to the message of the Beautiful Lady of La Salette are preparing for the... Czytaj więcej
Fr. René Butler MS - 27th Ordinary Sunday -...
Anxiety, with Trust (27th Ordinary Sunday: Isaiah 5:1-7; Philippians 4:6-9; Matthew 21:33-43) St. Paul writes, “Have no anxiety at all.” Surely this is unrealistic. In fact, the same Apostle wrote to the Corinthians, “I came to you in weakness... Czytaj więcej
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Saturday, 26 September 2020 13:17

New Provincial Council in Italy

It is with a great joy that we announce the new Provincial Council of the Province of Mary Mediatrix (Italy). The Provincial Chapter which is currently in session in Salmata elected today September 24, 2020: 

Fr. Gian Matteo Roggio, Provincial Superior (center)

Fr. Heliodoro Bernardos Santiago, First Councilor (right)

Fr. Amador Marugán Patiño, Second Councilor (left)

We recommend to your prayers the success of their ministry in the service of the Province of Italy of the whole Congregation and of the Church.

Published in INFO (EN)

The Lord will Provide

(28th Ordinary Sunday: Isaiah 25:6-10; Philippians 4:12-20; Matthew 22:1-14)

Just look at all things that God promises, in our first reading, to provide for his people! The image of rich food and choice wines is so enticing, it might almost distract us from all the rest. 

There is so much more: he will destroy death forever, wipe away tears from every face, remove his people’s reproach from the whole earth. See how in each case God’s intervention is definitive, complete.

So too in today’s Psalm, which sums up the reality from our perspective: “Even though I walk in the dark valley I fear no evil; for you are at my side.”

And yet, it seems that today these images have lost their appeal. It is like the wedding guests who not only refuse to come to the feast, but abuse the messengers. How discouraging this can be for believers, as they see their numbers decrease.

In 1846, the anticlerical legacy of the French Revolution was still strong. This was the context of Mary’s Apparition at La Salette. Reproaching her people, she hoped to remove their reproach; speaking of the death of small children, she hoped they would turn in trust to the One who has destroyed death forever.

It is one thing, like St. Paul, to know how to live in humble circumstances and with abundance, materially speaking. Many people manage that. But it is quite another thing to deprive ourselves of what the Lord offers us. Paul makes a promise every bit as wonderful as Isaiah’s: “My God will fully supply whatever you need, in accord with his glorious riches in Christ Jesus.”

This requires chiefly one thing: the wedding garment, which is faith. And the living faith that the Beautiful Lady wishes to reawaken will enable us to do the three things she asks of us: to convert, to pray well, and to make her message known.

Conversion includes but is not restricted to returning to the Sacraments. If we remember the seven “Capital” sins, we can ask the Lord to “enlighten the eyes of our hearts,” so as to discern what virtues and behaviors we personally will need to cultivate, and “so that we may know what is the hope that belongs to our call.”

Wayne Vanasse, and Fr. René Butler, M.S.

Published in MISSION (EN)
Thursday, 17 September 2020 08:06

Marian Year

Marian Year

The Marian Year will begin on 19 September 2020. The Congregation of the Missionaries of Our Lady of La Salette and the Lay faithful Who carry and are very close to the message of the Beautiful Lady of La Salette are preparing for the 175th anniversary of the apparition of Our Lady at La Salette (19.09.2021).

(For further information, see the letter from the Superior General for 19 September 2020. In the attachment…)

Published in INFO (EN)
Thursday, 17 September 2020 08:06

Marian Year - prayer

Published in INFO (EN)

Anxiety, with Trust

(27th Ordinary Sunday: Isaiah 5:1-7; Philippians 4:6-9; Matthew 21:33-43)

St. Paul writes, “Have no anxiety at all.” Surely this is unrealistic. In fact, the same Apostle wrote to the Corinthians, “I came to you in weakness and fear and much trembling” (1 Cor 2:3).

The world we live in has always provided every generation ample cause for worry. Natural disasters, disease, social unrest, economic uncertainty are all around us. We also deal with personal loss, conflicts and self-doubt, etc. How is it possible to be without anxiety?

For some it is even hard to find time to pray, or have a proper frame of mind for prayer, so as to live in the peace of Christ.

Strangely, Isaiah’s song about his friend’s vineyard was, in fact, meant to heighten his people’s stress. The things the Lord will do to his vineyard are listed in order to get his people’s attention. He would rather not punish them, but how else can he persuade them to change their ways?

At La Salette, Mary used the same approach as Isaiah, and for the same purpose. If her people refuse to submit, the causes of their anxiety will only get worse, and it will be their own fault for, in their own way, like the chief priests and the elders in the Gospel, they have rejected her Son.

It certainly is appropriate for us to apply Isaiah’s message, and Mary’s, to ourselves. The vineyard lovingly planted in each of us by God at our baptism, needs to be watered and pruned, so that we can produce sweet grapes to make fine wine. The Beautiful Lady provides us with an examination of conscience, in view of our ongoing conversion.

St. Paul further says, “In everything, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, make your requests known to God.” When thanksgiving is at the heart of our prayer, trust is reinforced. This is part of praying well.

In this context, I highly recommend the Book of Tobit as a marvelous example. Two unhappy persons, in separate scenes, pray for death. In each case the prayer begins with praise of God! 

Are anxiety and trust incompatible? No, but Mary’s love and tears will inspire trust and relieve anxiety.

Wayne Vanasse, and Fr. René Butler, M.S.

Published in MISSION (EN)

Seeing Signs, Being Signs

(26th Ordinary Sunday: Ezekiel 18:25-28; Philippians 2:1-11; Matthew 21:28-32)

“As for you, you pay no heed!” says the Beautiful Lady, speaking of her efforts on our behalf. A little later, in reference to the poor harvests: “I warned you last year with the potatoes. You paid no heed.”

The attitude she describes might be mere heedlessness, a failure to notice. After all, how could Christians of such weak faith be expected to recognize signs coming from heaven? But that is no excuse, because they did not even care to see.

In the Gospel, Jesus says to the chief priests and the elders: “When John came to you in the way of righteousness, you did not believe him; but tax collectors and prostitutes did.” The chief priests and the elders were aware of this, but they did not see it as a sign, least of all intended for them. This is what St. Paul calls vainglory.

The Missionaries of Our Lady of La Salette state in their Rule, “Attentive to the signs of the times and after prayer and discernment, we generously undertake those apostolic tasks to which we believe Providence is calling us.” The La Salette Sisters are “mindful of the urgent needs of people contingent upon the milieux, countries and times.”

La Salette Laity, too, must be aware that times change. The charism of reconciliation is one, but its expression is infinitely variable. We need to pay heed to the circumstances where it is needed, and find the appropriate way to bring it to bear.

This requires a certain death to self, i.e., the acknowledgement that we are not all-knowing and the willingness to work together. This is the point St. Paul makes to the community of Philippi, and he gives the example of Jesus, who “emptied himself,” so as to be truly one with us.

The psalmist often humbles himself by admitting his sins, but today he asks God, as it were, not to notice them, as he prays: “The sins of my youth and my frailties remember not.” In the Sacrament of Reconciliation, we trust that “He guides the humble to justice, and teaches the humble his way.”

When we are open to receiving and sharing God’s mercy, who knows? We may ourselves become a sign.

Wayne Vanasse, and Fr. René Butler, M.S.

Published in MISSION (EN)
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